Archive for Miscellaneous Data

Body Fat Percentages

 

A QUICK LOOK INTO BODY FAT

Body fat percentage in athletes:
Athletes typically have significantly lower body fat. For example, body fat percentages of about 20 percent for fit women, and 10 percent for fit men are not uncommon.

Body fat percentage increases with improper weight gain:
For average people that do not work out, weight-gain equals fat-gain. Our body fat increases while our lean tissue or muscle remains fairly constant. So for most people, body fat percentage increases with every pound of weight gained.

Body fat percentage and weight loss:
In general, whenever you reduce weight by following a sensible weight loss diet, you lose mostly body fat. Even though you also lose some lean tissue (muscle), you lose a lot more fat. So your body fat percentage will reduce. However, if you fast, or try a fad diet, or use weight loss pills, most of your weight loss may be water-only. So your body fat percentage will stay virtually unchanged.

Body fat percentage and repeated dieting:
Repeated dieting involving weight loss then weight gain then weight loss etc.
(yo-yo weigh loss) tends to increase our body fat percentage. Because when we lose weight we also lose some muscle, but when we regain weight this muscle is not replaced. Result? We have increased our fat and decreased our muscle thus raising our body fat percentage. Another reason why it is important to exercise when dieting, in order to reduce muscle loss.

Normal body fat percentage:
A certain amount of fat is essential for energy reserves, bodily functions and body protection. However, at present there is no definite guidelines on healthy body fat percentage.

Body fat distribution:
Where your excess body fat is distributed is as important than the amount of
body fat you have. Recent studies have shown that extra fat around the waist
means a higher risk for developing ill-health (as in a heart attack) than fat carried on the thighs and buttocks.

KEY IS TO ALWAYS KEEP EXERCISING. Even if for only 10-15 minutes per day.
For those of you that are IronGloves members, feel free to take photos of our weekly whiteboard. Get yourself to do it 3 x per week!

 

 

Heavy Bag Training

The key to the heavy bag is learning to use it properly. In return, it will help develop power and hand speed along with overall body conditioning.

I suggest not using bag gloves, this could harm your hands over time. I recommend using 14 oz. gloves for the guys and 12 oz. for the girls.

Wear a mouthpiece when hitting the bag, this will help build up the lungs, you will learn to breath properly, in and out of your nose. Do not get in the habit of holding your breath as you punch, this will be a difficult habit to break. Always exhale as you hit.

Every boxer should know how to pull their punches. This is mandatory when I train my people on the heavy bag. To pull a punch: As you hit the heavy bag, drive into the bag 3 to 4 inches, whip it back to your defensive position as fast as possible. If the bag is swinging or rocking excessively, then this means you are pushing (the bag) more than you are whipping back your punch. A proper strike should have a snap on it with a cracking sound upon contact.

As your speed increases on the heavy bag so will your back speed. To accomplish both, it will prevent you from being counter punched. It will also help you with your balance, preventing you from falling forward or leading with your chin.

Bag work is like road work, it needs to be changed up. Speed work, interval work, and power work all should be incorporated. I recommend 3 to 4 days a week on the heavy bag, and to always change the tempo. click here to watch a short video clip
HERE ARE A FEW HEAVY BAG TRAINING EXAMPLES

I. 3 to 4 rounds standing in place for 45 to 60 seconds, working your inside boxing skills. For instance, body shots, hooks, and short right crosses. Concentrate on stiff short punches, along with moving your head to one side and the other. Be aware of your hipand shoulder rotation. Finish the round with machine guns for 5 to 10 seconds nonstop.
Rest only 30 seconds between rounds.

II. 3 to 4 rounds moving around the bag for 2 to 3 minutes while working outside and while moving side to side. Work on timing of your punches with the movement of the bag. Concentrate on your footwork by doing less punching. Use your jab and cross while
moving around the bag, staying focused on your footwork. By doing this, it will seriously improve your physical endurance. Rest at least 1 minute between rounds.

III. 3 to 4 rounds; the first 20 seconds stand in place and go all out using combinations. The next 30 seconds move around pulling your punches. End with 10 seconds machine guns, for a total of 1 to 2 minute rounds.

There are several types of heavy bag interval training. The most important factor is to keep up with your bag training, don’t think you can skip a day. Keep changing up your bag training mode, this will keep your body shocked so that you do not become too
comfortable in a pacing type style.

“VICTORY BELONGS TO THOSE WHOM PERSEVERE”

 

CrossFit: Can it be Dangerous?

Rhabdomyolysis, a relatively rare condition, occurs when muscle tissue breaks down to such an extent that toxins released into the blood stream can damage the kidneys.

Rhabdomyolysis disease linked to Crossfit and PX90 exercising.

PLEASE READ, click on the above links to read.

 

Icing an Injury: Sprain or Strain

 

At the onset of an injury and/or feeling of pain, it is very important to ice for the first 48 to 72 hours and elevate the injured area. Ideally ice should be applied 5 to 10 minutes of injury.

Apply ice pack for 20 minutes at a time every 2 to 3 hours. Do not use heat in the beginning, heat will cause blood vessels to enlarge, causing the pain to increase. To ice, use a bag of frozen peas or corn. Frozen veggies are much smaller than a baggy full of ice cubes, therefore conforming easier to the body part.

Do NOT ice an injury for more than 20 minutes at a time, this will not speed up the healing process, and it can cause damage to the tissues (frostbite).

Ace cold press is what I use. It’s made of fabric, will not burn the skin, 10.5″ long, and will last forever. Walgreen’s and Amazon sells them.
Cold-pack
Take it from me about the importance of immediate icing, I have torn my bicep twice, dislocated shoulder, damaged both wrists, and so on. Injuries never end for the boxer or lifter.

APPLYING HEAT: After 72 hours, apply heat instead of ice. Use heat pads, hot soaks, hot showers, or heat liniments and ointments. It not always necessary to apply heat, it depends on if you are still experiencing pain.

Diary of the Heavy Bag- Training Tips

 

The key to the heavy bag is learning to use it properly. In return, it will help develop power and hand speed along with overall body conditioning.I suggest not using bag gloves, this could harm your hands over time. I recommend using 14 oz. gloves for the guys and 12 oz. for the girls.Wear a mouthpiece when hitting the bag, this will help build up the lungs. Learn to breath properly, in and out of your nose. Do not get in the habit of holding your breath as you punch, this will be a difficult habit to break. Always exhale as you hit.

Every boxer should know how to pull their punches. This is mandatory when I train my people on the heavy bag. To pull a punch: As you hit the heavy bag, drive into the bag 3 to 4 inches, whip it back to your defensive position as fast as possible. If the bag is swinging or rocking excessively, then this means you are pushing (the bag) more than you are whipping back your punch. A proper strike should have a snap on it with a cracking sound upon contact.

As your speed increases on the heavy bag so will your back speed. To accomplish both, it will prevent you from being counter punched. It will also help you with your balance, preventing you from falling forward or leading with your chin.

Bag work is like road work, it needs to be changed up. Speed work, interval work, and power work all should be incorporated. I recommend 3 to 4 days a week on the heavy bag, and to always change the tempo.

click here to view my YouTube Heavy Bag Instruction channel

 

HERE ARE A FEW HEAVY BAG TRAINING EXAMPLES

I. 3 to 4 rounds standing in place for 45 to 60 seconds, working your inside boxing skills.
For instance, body shots, hooks, and short right crosses. Concentrate on stiff short
punches, along with moving your head to one side and the other. Be aware of your hip
and shoulder rotation. Finish the round with machine guns for 5 to 10 seconds nonstop.
Rest only 30 seconds between rounds.

II. 3 to 4 rounds moving around the bag for 2 to 3 minutes while working outside and
while moving side to side. Work on timing of your punches with the movement of the
bag. Concentrate on your footwork by doing less punching. Use your jab and cross while
moving around the bag, staying focused on your footwork. By doing this, it will seriously
improve your physical endurance. Rest at least 1 minute between rounds.

III. 3 to 4 rounds; the first 20 seconds stand in place and go all out using combinations.
The next 30 seconds move around pulling your punches. End with 10 seconds machine
guns, for a total of 1 to 2 minute rounds.

There are several types of heavy bag interval training. The most important factor is to keep up with your bag training, don’t think you can skip a day. Keep changing up your bag training mode, this will keep your body shocked so that you do not become too comfortable in a pacing type style.

“VICTORY BELONGS TO THOSE WHOM PERSEVERE”

 

Motivation for the Boxer

 

WHAT MOTIVATES A BOXER TO TRAIN HARD

I can only speak for myself, perhaps what you read here will help motivate you.

Back in my boxing training days, there were two main thoughts that I always kept in the back of my mind, these two kept me hungry and motivated on a daily training basis…

1) When meeting your opponent in the ring or even if sparring, wondering if the other guy trained harder than you.

2) The fear of not winning, having to face defeat, or, at the very least, did I perform at my best when it was all said and done.

Fear is a good thing, it causes you to rise to the occasion. Fear of losing in the ring, will get you up early in the morning and into the gym.

Mental is as important as physical training. Before my daily training I would ask myself “Are you a Warrior or are you Weak?”. I would set up different surprising physical demands. For instance, jump rope nonstop for 20-30 minutes, or it might be 5 minutes straight of heavy bag training. YOU MUST ALWAYS TAKE IT TO THE NEXT STEP, DO NOT CHEAT YOURSELF BY SHAVING OFF ANY OF YOUR WORKOUT.

Your Aura/Character- I always believed that it is better to be a quiet deadly weapon, rather than a loud ranting ego idiot. These gym types motivated me, looking forward to sparring them in the ring. Your opponents ego, never let them get to you, use it to train harder and wait for that day in the ring. When you behave like a lion, keeping to yourself, keeps people guessing, they try to figure you out, and that is a pretty good feeling.

Arrogance verses Confidence are two different types of animal. Being self-assured is a good thing, every day you should question your actions, don’t let any surprising answers come out in the ring. Know who you are, be confident.

The arrogant type are the same as the talkers, they go down in the ring easy. Always carry yourself proud, always be ready to lend a helping training hand to those that are pushed around by the loud mouths. This will give you more respect by others. Demanding respect with your mouth is a sign of immature weakness. We all know that, too bad they don’t.

Visualization plays a major role in your training. My wife Renene used it when competing in Powerlifting. After she was done with her training for the day (on heavy days), she would sit down in a quiet corner and picture herself doing the lifts. If is was the squat, she would count out the steps to take walking the bar out, see herself descending, popping back up, walking the weight back in and racking it. Then the final visual would be the judges giving the green light and the crowd roaring. She was extremely focused and never once red lighted at a meet. Power Lifters have a lot to take from, they are true mental and physical beasts. Think about, how else can some of those guys bench over 600 or squat more than 1000 lbs. Sure you might say they have supplementation assistance, but their body must still rely on their mental.

When I trained, I always told myself “there is no ‘Time Out’ in the ring, my conditioning must be at 100%”. Fear of failure is a great motivator, it will keep you coming to the gym every day, to only train harder every time. If you have a bad day in the gym, then get back in there the next day and train even harder. Demand more of yourself!

It is important to have your training structured, make goal sheets, plan out your workouts on a weekly basis. Same goes for your personal life, keep your lifestyle and home organized then you shall have NO training distractions.

Don’t allow negatives to remain in your head, pick yourself up, give it a kick and move forward. My two favorite quotes of mine are “No Excuses” and “No One will Outwork me Today”.

 

You can overcome anything, you must be strong willed and BE a hard worker!
by Joe Leinhauser

How to measure Boxing Glove size?

If right handed, measure your right hand, if left handed, then measure left.

Small size: 6″ to 7.5″ circumference = 12oz glove.
Regular/Medium size: 7.5″ to 8.5″ circumference = 14oz glove.
Large size: 8.5″ to 9.5″ circumference = 16oz glove.
XL size: 9.5″ & Above circumference = 18oz or 20oz glove.

Our Shield Logo

Thank you John & Aiden Lerew for our cool HUGE wall plaque! It ROCKS!
Talk about a custom welding job!
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